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by Jeff Rasansky - July 12, 2012
Jeff Rasansky
Jeff Rasansky, managing partner of Rasansky Law Firm, is an aggressive Dallas personal injury lawyer with 25 years of legal experience.

All parents know that you can’t control when a baby decides to come. Whether it’s in the middle of the night, in the middle of your weekend, or on a holiday, labor can start at any time and doesn’t wait for a convenient break. However, does the time of day or the day of the week affect whether or not your child might suffer a birth injury?

The weekend effect and medical malpractice

Extensive research has found that rates of medical malpractice rise during nontraditional business hours – nights, weekends, and holidays. Specifically, studies have found that medical mistakes increase during these times when it comes to labor, delivery, and NICU care.

Why are errors more common during this time? Researchers believe that staff shortages are more common in hospitals at night and that the available staff is often suffering from overwork and fatigue. When tired and stressed medical professionals care for patients, they are more likely to make errors in judgment, commit medication errors, or fail to see a warning sign or a correct diagnosis. When it comes to labor and delivery, birth injuries can be the consequence of sleeping physicians, physicians who are rushing mothers to give birth, or overworked doctors who miss an important red flag.

Dallas birth injury attorney

Was your baby harmed during labor and delivery – and still suffers from the consequences today? Whether the birth injury took place because of the “weekend effect” or other instances of negligence, you may wish to speak with a Texas medical malpractice lawyer. Call Rasansky Law Firm today to schedule a free and private appointment.

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